Prevention & Treatment of Arrhythmia

Updated:Oct 25,2012

Nurse Talking To Patient In Hospital Bed

Do you need treatment?

Most arrhythmias are considered harmless and are left untreated. Once your doctor has documented that you have an arrhythmia, he or she will need to find out whether it's abnormal or merely reflects the heart's normal processes. He or she will also determine whether your arrhythmia is clinically significant – that is, whether it causes symptoms or puts you at risk for more serious arrhythmias or complications of arrhythmias in the future (View an animation of arrhythmia).  If your arrhythmia is abnormal and clinically significant, your doctor will set a treatment plan.

Treatment goals

  • Prevent blood clots from forming to reduce stroke risk
  • Control your heart rate within a relatively normal range
  • Restore a normal heart rhythm, if possible
  • Treat heart disease/condition that may be causing arrhythmia
  • Reduce other risk factors for heart disease and stroke
Learn about:

Living With Arrhythmias

  • Take all medications exactly as prescribed.
  • Never stop taking any prescription medication without first consulting your healthcare provider.
  • If you have any side effects, tell your healthcare provider about them.
  • Tell your healthcare provider about all your other drugs and supplements, including over-the-counter medications and vitamins. Track all your medicines online with Heart360 or download our printable medication log.


Clinical Trials
Clinical trials are scientific studies that determine if a possible new medical advance can help people and whether it has harmful side effects. Find answers to common questions about clinical trials in our Guide to Understanding Clinical Trials.



This content was last reviewed on 05/30/2012.


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